Chat with us, powered by LiveChat

FDA proposes rule to notify women with dense breasts about increased cancer risk and imprecise mammograms

The FDA is proposing a rule for breast cancer screenings that would require doctors to give women more information about the risks associated with dense breasts.  Read the full article here.

Caduceus Chief Medical Officer, Gregg DeNicola MD, shares his take for our patients.

“Informing women that their amount of breast density may affect results of the mammogram and their risks be outlined just makes common sense; it’s hard to imagine any body opposing this recommendation. Yes; it is more time necessary to advise patients as the physician, but it is essential women are educated on the details of their mammogram.  In California, such a requirement already exists and is enforced so it will have little impact for our patients, but to set this as a national standard is just smart medicine.”

Hormone replacement therapy for women- Is it right for you?

There have been many recent articles and online buzz about hormone replacement therapy for women and our Chief Medical Officer and Caduceus physician Gregg DeNicola MD wanted to weigh in on the discussion.

Sign with Hormone Replacement Therapy on itTo provide some perspective, in 2002, an extensive study of over 16,000 women supported by the National Institutes of Health, was halted after discovering that the drugs, a combination of estrogen and progestin, caused small increases in breast cancer, heart attacks, strokes and blood clots. Those risks outweighed the drugs’ benefits -a small decrease in hip fractures and a decrease in colorectal cancer. A year later a comparable study was also stopped in the UK after comparable findings.

Chief Medical Officer Dr. DeNicola agrees, “The fact is a large, prospective study has never been executed proving hormone replacement therapy is indeed safe.  This is an emotional issue and the data is definitely conflicting. Both sides have ample data to support their position.  At Caduceus, we do not routinely recommend or dissuade the use of HRT. The decision is individualized after discussion between the patient and provider. Until the evidence is more definitive, it is the most prudent policy for our patients.”

More questions?  Schedule an in-office or virtual video chat with your Caduceus provider.

Millions of Americans incorrectly think they have food allergies, study finds

Sign that says food allergies surrounded by foodYou may have read the story recently that new research suggests Americans may be over-diagnosing themselves with food allergies. A study published in the medical journal JAMA Network Open estimates that nearly 19 percent of adults think they have food allergies, but less than 11 percent actually do.

Caduceus Chief Medical Officer Gregg Denicola MD adds, “I have felt this way for a long time and agree less than 10 percent of Americans have documented food allergies.  Most allergies are to fish and nuts.  (more…)

New Peanut Allergy Drug Shows ‘Lifesaving’ Potential

The word Allergy on top of peanutsResults from a new study may lead to approval of what could be the first drug that ameliorates potentially deadly reactions in children with severe peanut allergies.  Caduceus physician and Chief Medical Officer Gregg DeNicola MD weighs in, “I agree with the spirit of the article; a breakthrough and very promising, but not necessarily a cure. Peanut allergy sufferers will need to abstain until further evidence can support the findings.”

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/11/18/well/live/new-peanut-allergy-drug-shows-lifesaving-potential.html\

 

Colorectal cancer screening? To screen or not to screen before 50?

As CMO for Caduceus Medical Group, Gregg Denicola MD agrees that colon cancer is striking at a younger age than previous years.  Especially in high-risk populations, earlier screening may be beneficial.

He shares that the data that the American Cancer Society is using appears to be somewhat mixed and does not definitively show a benefit for screening prior to age 50. Also he notes, there would be increased costs in earlier screening recommendations and whether finding a cancer a few years earlier would decrease mortality has not been proven effective. (more…)